Jeff Duntemann's Technology Projects 
1968: When I got to Lane Tech in 1966, the astronomy club had a finished 8" Newtonian tube assembly, but no mount. I designed and coordinated the building of the mount shown here.
1968: When I got to Lane Tech in 1966, the astronomy club had a finished 8" Newtonian tube assembly, but no mount. I designed and coordinated the building of the mount shown here.
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1970: My 8: vent-pipe scope at a partial solar eclipse near Chicago. The scope itself dates back to 1968.
1970: My 8: vent-pipe scope at a partial solar eclipse near Chicago. The scope itself dates back to 1968.
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1970: My 10" scope at the same partial solar eclipse outing, with Joe Lill for scale. The scope was barely complete, and needed a lot of tweaking, but the images it brought us were breathtaking.
1970: My 10" scope at the same partial solar eclipse outing, with Joe Lill for scale. The scope was barely complete, and needed a lot of tweaking, but the images it brought us were breathtaking.
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1970: I'm focusing George Hodous' SLR at the suitably filtered sun, with Ben Kuehlhorn looking on.
1970: I'm focusing George Hodous' SLR at the suitably filtered sun, with Ben Kuehlhorn looking on.
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5/73: While waiting for my Novice license to show up, I built a 5W CW transmitter from an article in Electronics Illustrated. It had no power transformer, and the key jack was connected right to the 120V wall. I called it the Shockbox, and used it for a couple of months until I bought a Knight T-60.
5/73: While waiting for my Novice license to show up, I built a 5W CW transmitter from an article in Electronics Illustrated. It had no power transformer, and the key jack was connected right to the 120V wall. I called it the Shockbox, and used it for a couple of months until I bought a Knight T-60.
Viewed: 7799 times.

1977: I built these two ham receivers after a couple of articles in QST. The radio on the left is the 20M "Africa" receiver, and the one on the right is the Herring-Aid 5, which I mounted on a canned ham can so it would be a "ham radio." The Africa receiver works very well and I still have it; the Herring Aid was a disaster and I scrapped it when we left Rochester in 1985.
1977: I built these two ham receivers after a couple of articles in QST. The radio on the left is the 20M "Africa" receiver, and the one on the right is the Herring-Aid 5, which I mounted on a canned ham can so it would be a "ham radio." The Africa receiver works very well and I still have it; the Herring Aid was a disaster and I scrapped it when we left Rochester in 1985.
Viewed: 6466 times.

1977: After getting some experience with the original COSMAC Elf, I designed and built a much-expanded version, and constructed it on a discarded Xerox 3100 copier platen cover. It worked very well, and I had an OAM paper tape reader interfaced to it.
1977: After getting some experience with the original COSMAC Elf, I designed and built a much-expanded version, and constructed it on a discarded Xerox 3100 copier platen cover. It worked very well, and I had an OAM paper tape reader interfaced to it.
Viewed: 6022 times.

1977: Side view of the COSMAC system. It was all-CMOS, with a keypad and two independent parallel ports. I would have done more with it, but in late 1979 I got an S-100 system and spent my spare-time energy on that instead.
1977: Side view of the COSMAC system. It was all-CMOS, with a keypad and two independent parallel ports. I would have done more with it, but in late 1979 I got an S-100 system and spent my spare-time energy on that instead.
Viewed: 5899 times.

1977: I wire-wrapped the COSMAC system on a perf board with a 50-pin edge connector. It used 20 256 X 4 RAM chips, for 2,560 bytes of memory, which was huge for a hand-built machine.
1977: I wire-wrapped the COSMAC system on a perf board with a 50-pin edge connector. It used 20 256 X 4 RAM chips, for 2,560 bytes of memory, which was huge for a hand-built machine.
Viewed: 6477 times.

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